If the Doctrine of Predestination is clearly taught in the Bible, then why is this doctrine so divisive and controversial?

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If the Doctrine of Predestination is clearly taught in the Bible, then why is this doctrine so divisive and controversial?

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Topic: the Supreme Court Ruling on the Cross

The Supreme Court recently ruled that a 40-foot memorial cross in the state of Maryland was not unconstitutional. The cross was built in 1925 to commemorate many soldiers from St. George’s County who died in service to their country in World War I. The American Humanist Association sued to have the cross torn down. The 4th Circuit Court of Appeals (out of Richmond, Virginia) agreed with the AHA, and the cross had a sentence of death hanging over it. First Liberty Institute, which fights for religious liberty (including a lot of military memorial type cases), fought to save the cross, on behalf of the American Legion. The SCOTUS made their decision, 7-2. Jeremy Dys, a key attorney at First Liberty, joins Jerry Newcombe to discuss this June 20, 2019 decision. www.firstliberty.org

 

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Topic: The Critical Role of Ministers in America’s Founding

During the colonial era, the clergymen played a prominent role—even in terms of helping America become independent. They were derisively called “the black-robed regiment” (because of the color of their robes). The name stuck. Dr. Donald S. Lutz, author and professor emeritus at the University of Houston, said, “The prominence of ministers in the political literature of the period attests to the continuing influence of religion during the founding era.” 19th century author John Wingate Thornton put it this way, “To the Pulpit, the Puritan Pulpit, we owe the moral force which won our independence.” Dan Fisher, a pastor in Oklahoma who has served in that state’s House of Representatives, is a student of the black-robed regiment. He even wrote a book about it—Bringing Back the Black Robed Regiment. Dan Fisher joins Jerry Newcombe to discuss the critical role of American clergymen (particularly those of New England) to our independence. www.danfisherbrr.com

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